Hair as a noninvasive tool for risk assessment: do the concentrations of cadmium and lead in the hair of wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) reflect internal concentrations? - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Year : 2014

Hair as a noninvasive tool for risk assessment: do the concentrations of cadmium and lead in the hair of wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) reflect internal concentrations?

Abstract

There is an increasing need for developing noninvasive markers of accumulation when studying the transfer of pollutants in wildlife, in response to problems caused by sacrifice of animals (disturbed population dynamics, respect of ethical protocols). Thus, the aim of this work was to determine whether trace metal (TM) concentrations in hair could be used as an accurate noninvasive estimator of internal and environmental concentrations. For that purpose, on a 40km² site surrounding an ancient smelter, 321 wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were sampled on seven squares (500×500m) and 4 squares in fall 2010 and spring 2011, respectively. The relationships between the cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) concentrations in hair and those in the liver, kidneys, and soils were described. The results indicated that hair concentration was a relatively good predictor of Pb concentrations in organs (p<0.001, 0.46
No file

Dates and versions

hal-01115160 , version 1 (10-02-2015)

Identifiers

Cite

Nicolas Tête, Eve Afonso, Nadia Crini, Séverine Drouhot, Anne-Sophie Prudent, et al.. Hair as a noninvasive tool for risk assessment: do the concentrations of cadmium and lead in the hair of wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) reflect internal concentrations?. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 2014, 108, pp.233-41. ⟨10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.07.010⟩. ⟨hal-01115160⟩
87 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More