Distribution of native plants and birds on 27 remote Tuamotu atolls (South Pacific Ocean): a contribution to the Island species-area relationship - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Physical Geography Year : 2024

Distribution of native plants and birds on 27 remote Tuamotu atolls (South Pacific Ocean): a contribution to the Island species-area relationship

Abstract

Island species-area relationship (ISAR) is the most documented pattern in island biogeography. Different hypotheses were advanced to explain this pattern. In this study, I selected 27 remote Tuamotu atolls in the South Pacific Ocean with complete surveys of native species richness of birds and vascular plants to test the influence of four abiotic predictors on species richness (atoll emerged area, habitat diversity, mean elevation, and number of islets). Linear regressions were used to assess the relative influence of predictors on native species richness while stepwise regression was then used to identify the best model. Atoll area was a significant predictor to explain native bird and plant species richness, attesting ISAR on the remote surveyed atolls. Stepwise model demonstrated that both habitat diversity and atoll area explained bird species richness, whereas atoll area and mean elevation were the best predictors for native plants. These results suggest that ISAR can be related to different hypotheses, depending on the taxon studied. Among hypotheses, the simple “target-area” hypothesis was a suitable framework to explain ISAR of native birds, while the “disturbance” hypothesis was relevant to support ISAR of native plants observed on the atolls.
No file

Dates and versions

hal-04601273 , version 1 (04-06-2024)

Identifiers

Cite

Sébastien Larrue. Distribution of native plants and birds on 27 remote Tuamotu atolls (South Pacific Ocean): a contribution to the Island species-area relationship. Physical Geography, 2024, pp.1-14. ⟨10.1080/02723646.2024.2361990⟩. ⟨hal-04601273⟩
0 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More