Unsupervised Domain Adaptation With Optimal Transport in Multi-Site Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions From MRI Data - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience Year : 2020

Unsupervised Domain Adaptation With Optimal Transport in Multi-Site Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions From MRI Data

Abstract

Automatic segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images is essential for clinical assessment and treatment planning of MS. Recent years have seen an increasing use of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) for this task. Although these methods provide accurate segmentation, their applicability in clinical settings remains limited due to a reproducibility issue across different image domains. MS images can have highly variable characteristics across patients, MRI scanners and imaging protocols; retraining a supervised model with data from each new domain is not a feasible solution because it requires manual annotation from expert radiologists. In this work, we explore an unsupervised solution to the problem of domain shift. We present a framework, Seg-JDOT, which adapts a deep model so that samples from a source domain and samples from a target domain sharing similar representations will be similarly segmented. We evaluated the framework on a multi-site dataset, MICCAI 2016, and showed that the adaptation towards a target site can bring remarkable improvements in a model performance over standard training.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
fncom-14-00019.pdf (1.83 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin Explicit agreement for this submission
Loading...

Dates and versions

hal-02317028 , version 1 (15-10-2019)
hal-02317028 , version 2 (11-05-2020)

Identifiers

Cite

Antoine Ackaouy, Nicolas Courty, Emmanuel Vallée, Olivier Commowick, Christian Barillot, et al.. Unsupervised Domain Adaptation With Optimal Transport in Multi-Site Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions From MRI Data. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 2020, 14, pp.1-13. ⟨10.3389/fncom.2020.00019⟩. ⟨hal-02317028v2⟩
692 View
285 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More