Achievement goals and perceived ability predict investment in learning a sport task - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles British Journal of Educational Psychology Year : 1997

Achievement goals and perceived ability predict investment in learning a sport task

Abstract

Two studies examined the predictive value of achievement goals on the investment in learning a sport task. Ss were aged 13-15 yrs and attended schools in northern France. In Study 1, 57 Ss prepared themselves for a sport task with a 5-min period of training. In Study 2, 99 Ss prepared themselves with a 5-min period of training after prior failure. Results of Study 1 show that Ss who were ego-involved with a low perceived ability had a weaker investment in the training situation than Ss ego-involved with a high perceived ability, or Ss task-involved regardless of their perceived ability. Ego-involved Ss used an attributional bias to minimize the effect of effort on performance. Study 2 confirmed these results by underlining the motivational deficits of ego involvement for those with a low perceived ability. Pupils with high ego involvement in a sport task and low perceived ability show motivational deficits which manifest themselves in less time spent on practicing a task. A social-cognitive and expectancy-value perspective appears to be valid for the study of motivational processes in school physical education.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Cury_etal_BJEP1997.pdf (727.62 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Explicit agreement for this submission

Dates and versions

hal-00387226 , version 1 (25-05-2009)

Identifiers

Cite

François Cury, Stuart K. Biddle, Philippe Sarrazin, Jean-Pierre Famose. Achievement goals and perceived ability predict investment in learning a sport task. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 1997, 67 (3), pp.293-309. ⟨10.1111/j.2044-8279.1997.tb01245.x⟩. ⟨hal-00387226⟩
209 View
759 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More