Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Neurobiology of Aging Year : 2009

Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice

(1, 2) , (2) , (2) , (3) , (2) , (2, 4) , (3)
1
2
3
4

Abstract

Amyloid deposits are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies, in transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease showed that, using in vivo, contrast agent-free, MRI, thalamic amyloid plaques are more easily detected than other plaques of the brain. Our study evaluated the characteristics of these thalamic plaques in a large population of APP/PS1, PS1 and C57BL/6 mice. Thalamic spots were detected in all mice but with different frequency and magnitude. Hence, the prevalence and size of the lesions were higher in APP/PS1 mice. However, even in APP/PS1 mice, thalamic spots did not occur in all the old animals. In APP/PS1 mice, spots detection was related to high iron and calcium load within amyloid plaques and thus reflects the ability of such plaque to capture large amounts of minerals. Interestingly, calcium and iron was also detected in extra-thalamic plaques but with a lower intensity. Hypointense lesions in the thalamus were not associated with the iron load in the tissue surrounding the plaques, nor with micro-hemorrhages, inflammation, or a neurodegenerative context.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
2007BDelatour_Characterization of in vivo MRI.pdf (655.82 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

hal-00320356 , version 1 (25-05-2021)

Licence

Attribution - CC BY 4.0

Identifiers

Cite

Marc Dhenain, Nadine El Tannir El Tayara, Ting Di Wu, Maryvonne Guégan, Andreas Volk, et al.. Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice. Neurobiology of Aging, 2009, 30 (1), pp.41-53. ⟨10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2007.05.018⟩. ⟨hal-00320356⟩
62 View
74 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More