Gain-of-function mutations in STIM1 and ORAI1 causing tubular aggregate myopathy and Stormorken syndrome - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Cell Calcium Year : 2018

Gain-of-function mutations in STIM1 and ORAI1 causing tubular aggregate myopathy and Stormorken syndrome

Abstract

Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a key regulator for a large number of cellular functions in all kinds of cells, and small disturbances of Ca(2+) homeostasis can severely compromise normal physiology in various tissues and organs. A major mechanism controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis is store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which relies on the concerted action of the reticular Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel ORAI1. Gain-of-function mutations in the respective genes induce excessive Ca(2+) entry, and cause tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and Stormorken syndrome. Both disorders are part of a clinical continuum and involve muscle weakness and additional variably pronounced features including miosis, thrombocytopenia, hyposplenism, ichthyosis, dyslexia, and short stature. Mutations in the reticular Ca(2+) buffer calsequestrin (CASQ1) have moreover been associated with the mild end of the TAM/Stormorken syndrome spectrum. Here we review the clinical and histological characteristics of both disorders, provide an overview on the genetic causes, and thereby focus on the pathomechanisms leading to muscle dysfunction and the multi-systemic phenotype of tubular aggregate myopathy and Stormorken syndrome.

Domains

Genetics
No file

Dates and versions

hal-03661556 , version 1 (06-05-2022)

Identifiers

Cite

Johann Bohm, Jocelyn Laporte. Gain-of-function mutations in STIM1 and ORAI1 causing tubular aggregate myopathy and Stormorken syndrome. Cell Calcium, 2018, 76, pp.1-9. ⟨10.1016/j.ceca.2018.07.008⟩. ⟨hal-03661556⟩
31 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More