The Last Interglacial Ocean - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Quaternary Research Year : 1984

The Last Interglacial Ocean

Rose Marie L. Cline
  • Function : Author
James Hays
  • Function : Author
Warren Prell
  • Function : Author
William Ruddiman
  • Function : Author
Ted Moore
  • Function : Author
Nilva Kipp
  • Function : Author
Barbara Molfino
  • Function : Author
George Denton
  • Function : Author
Terence Hughes
  • Function : Author
William Balsam
  • Function : Author
Charlotte Brunner
  • Function : Author
Ann Esmay
  • Function : Author
James Fastook
  • Function : Author
John Imbrie
  • Function : Author
Lloyd Keigwin
  • Function : Author
Thomas Kellogg
  • Function : Author
Andrew Mcintyre
  • Function : Author
Robley Matthews
  • Function : Author
Alan Mix
Joseph Morley
  • Function : Author
Nicholas Shackleton
  • Function : Author
S. Stephen Streeter
  • Function : Author
Peter Thompson
  • Function : Author

Abstract

The final effort of the CLIMAP project was a study of the last interglaciation, a time of minimum ice volume some 122,000 yr ago coincident with the Substage 5e oxygen isotopic minimum. Based on detailed oxygen isotope analyses and biotic census counts in 52 cores across the world ocean, last interglacial sea-surface temperatures (SST) were compared with those today. There are small SST departures in the mid-latitude North Atlantic (warmer) and the Gulf of Mexico (cooler). The eastern boundary currents of the South Atlantic and Pacific oceans are marked by large SST anomalies in individual cores, but their interpretations are precluded by no-analog problems and by discordancies among estimates from different biotic groups. In general, the last interglacial ocean was not significantly different from the modern ocean. The relative sequencing of ice decay versus oceanic warming on the Stage 6/5 oxygen isotopic transition and of ice growth versus oceanic cooling on the Stage 5e/5d transition was also studied. In most of the Southern Hemisphere, the oceanic response marked by the biotic census counts preceded (led) the global ice-volume response marked by the oxygen-isotope signal by several thousand years. The reverse pattern is evident in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, where the oceanic response lagged that of global ice volume by several thousand years. As a result, the very warm temperatures associated with the last interglaciation were regionally diachronous by several thousand years. These regional lead-lag relationships agree with those observed on other transitions and in long-term phase relationships; they cannot be explained simply as artifacts of bioturbational translations of the original signals.

Dates and versions

hal-03516301 , version 1 (07-01-2022)

Identifiers

Cite

Rose Marie L. Cline, James Hays, Warren Prell, William Ruddiman, Ted Moore, et al.. The Last Interglacial Ocean. Quaternary Research, 1984, 21 (2), pp.123-224. ⟨10.1016/0033-5894(84)90098-X⟩. ⟨hal-03516301⟩

Collections

CEA CNRS
10 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More