Revisiting the role of the Gcm transcription factor, from master regulator to Swiss army knife - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Fly Year : 2016

Revisiting the role of the Gcm transcription factor, from master regulator to Swiss army knife

Abstract

Master genes are known to induce the differentiation of a multipotent cell into a specific cell type. These molecules are often transcription factors that switch on the regulatory cascade that triggers cell specification. Gcm was first described as the master gene of the glial fate in Drosophila as it induces the differentiation of neuroblasts into glia in the developing nervous system. Later on, Gcm was also shown to regulate the differentiation of blood, tendon and peritracheal cells as well as that of neuronal subsets. Thus, the glial master gene is used in at least 4 additional systems to promote differentiation. To understand the numerous roles of Gcm, we recently reported a genome-wide screen of Gcm direct targets in the Drosophila embryo. This screen provided new insight into the role and mode of action of this powerful transcription factor, notably on the interactions between Gcm and major differentiation pathways such as the Hedgehog, Notch and JAK/STAT. Here, we discuss the mode of action of Gcm in the different systems, we present new tissues that require Gcm and we revise the concept of 'master gene'.

Dates and versions

hal-03376912 , version 1 (13-10-2021)

Identifiers

Cite

Pierre Cattenoz, Angela Giangrande. Revisiting the role of the Gcm transcription factor, from master regulator to Swiss army knife. Fly, 2016, 10 (4), pp.210-218. ⟨10.1080/19336934.2016.1212793⟩. ⟨hal-03376912⟩
26 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More