Longitudinal study of the frequency and duration of breastfeeding in rural Bangladeshi women - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles American Journal of Human Biology Year : 2006

Longitudinal study of the frequency and duration of breastfeeding in rural Bangladeshi women

(1) , (2) , (1)
1
2

Abstract

A 27-month longitudinal study of 140 Bangladeshi mothers living in three tea gardens examined the effect of maternal factors (mother's age, number of live births, birth interval, and mother's work status) and sex of the infant on the duration and bout frequency of breastfeeding over 8-hr daytime periods. Prolonged breastfeeding of the infant was observed, but there was a sharp decline in duration of breastfeeding over the first 6 months, followed by a more gradual diminution thereafter. The feeding bouts showed a different pattern, with a more gradual decline over time. Housewives consistently showed a greater duration and bout frequency than women in paid employment as tea-pluckers. Over the first 6 months, primigravid mothers breastfed more frequently, but not thereafter. Older mothers (>35 years of age) breastfed with higher frequency during the first 2 months, but thereafter, the bout frequency decreased with increasing age of the infant. Over the 27-month study, maternal work status was the main factor associated with the duration and frequency of breastfeeding, with significantly higher frequency and duration among housewives. However, in the first 6 months after birth, there was very little difference in frequency or duration of breastfeeding between teaworkers and housewives, indicating that working mothers probably adjusted their time to breastfeed their infants before going, or after coming back, from work.
Not file

Dates and versions

hal-00820269 , version 1 (03-05-2013)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-00820269 , version 1

Cite

Rohini Ghosh, Nicholas C.G. Mascie-Taylor, Lyliane Rosetta. Longitudinal study of the frequency and duration of breastfeeding in rural Bangladeshi women. American Journal of Human Biology, 2006, 18 (5), pp.630-638. ⟨hal-00820269⟩

Collections

CNRS UPR2147
37 View
0 Download

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More